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Chance Yeh/Getty ImagesNicki Minaj’s brother was sentenced to 25 years to life Monday for raping his stepdaughter.

Jelani Maraj was sentenced by State Supreme Court Justice Robert McDonald in Nassau County Court in Long Island, NY, according to Newsday.

"She was 11 years old and you did this," McDonald told Maraj, who was convicted in 2017 of predatory sexual assault and child endangerment.

The victim testified during the trial that the abuse began when she was 11, and that Maraj sexually assaulted her repeatedly in 2015 while her mother was at work.  

In a letter in 2016, Nicki pleaded for mercy for her brother.

She described Jelani as ”the most patient, gentle, genuine, giving, selfless man" she knows and someone "who came to my mother's rescue often when she endured domestic violence so that she & I could sleep peacefully at night."

Nicki also accused the victim’s mother of attempting to extort $25 million from her.

Despite the pleas for mercy, McDonald said his heart was like a "stone."

The defense claims there was jury misconduct and filed for an appeal.

Jelani’s mother, Carol Minaj, said outside the courthouse, “He’s going to win in the appeal."

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Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.After debuting her new single, “Sometimes,” Sunday night on the Grammy Awards, H.E.R. dropped the inspirational track Monday.

“Sometimes” is the third single the 22- year-old artist has released this year, following “Slow Down,” featuring Skip Marley, and “Slide,” with YG.

H.E.R. was up for five awards at the Grammys, including Record of the Year and Song of the Year, for “Hard Place,” and Album of the Year for I Used to Know Her. She was shut out after winning two awards last year: Best R&B Album for her self-titled release, and Best R&B Performance for “Best Part,” featuring Daniel Caesar.

Tuesday night, H.E.R. will be among the stars recording the two-hour special Let's Go Crazy: The Grammy Salute to Princewhich will air later this year on CBS.

H.E.R will also appear with Missy Elliott in the Pepsi Zero commercial during the Super Bowl next Sunday.

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Phil McCarten/CBSTyler, the Creator won his first Grammy Award Sunday night, but the “See You Again” rapper isn't entirely happy about it.

"On one side, I’m very grateful that what I made could be acknowledged in a world like this, but also, it sucks that whenever we -- and I mean guys that look like me -- do anything that’s genre-bending or that’s anything, they always put it in a rap or urban category,” Tyler told reporters backstage.

“I don’t like that ‘urban’ word,” he added. “That’s just a politically correct way to say the n-word to me.”

“Why can’t we just be in pop?’ Half of me feels like the rap nomination was a backhanded compliment,” Tyler continued. “Like, oh, my little cousin wants to play the game, let’s give him the unplugged controller so he can shut up and feel good about it. That’s what it felt like a bit.”

Tyler won Best Rap Album, for Igor, and performed “Earfquake” and "New Magic Wand” from the album.

Tyler has shows coming up March 20 and 21 in New Orleans, followed by a performance at Pharrell Williams’ Something in the Water festival on April 25 in Virginia Beach, VA.

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UniversalIssa Rae and LaKeith Stanfield star in the upcoming romantic dramaThe Photograph.

The film's writer and director, Stella Meghie, shared during a panel discussion at the Sundance Film Festival that her grandmother was the leading inspiration behind the film. 

“My grandmother was about to meet a daughter that she had when she was very young that went to live with her father that she hadn’t seen in almost 30 years,” Meghie said, according to Essence.

The film details the story of a famous photographer and a rising journalist who find love unexpectedly in each other’s arms. Rae’s character, Mae, embarks on a journey to learn more about her mother after finding a photo of her with an unknown man. Eventually, she comes across Michael Block, played by Steinfield, who helps her find the answers to all her questions about her mother’s early life. 

Meghie recalled thinking, "What would it be like if you thought about someone every single day for 30 years, but didn't see them and love them?"

Meghie tells Essence that The Photograph is about black love and romance, which is is a favorite subject of hers.

"Whether it's romantic love, romantic black love or familiar black love, it's just what calls to me," she said. "It's what I like to write about and it'll continue to be a thread."

Meghie first worked with Issa Rae, who's also an executive director on the film, while directing an episode of Rae's HBO series, Insecure.

The Photograph, also starring Courtney B. Vance, comedian Lil Rey Howery and Teyonah Parris, will be in theaters February 14, 2020.

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Gabe Ginsberg/Getty ImagesKeyshia Cole is overwhelmed with joy and feeling optimistic after announcing her mother, Frankie Lons, has decided to check herself into a treatment facility for drug addiction.

In an Instagram post, the singer praises her mother for deciding to check herself in on her own.

"Maybe that's what'l make THIS Time different," she says. "This being what YOU WANTED AND NO ONE ELSE...."

Cole posted the message along with a photo of her family featuring Frankie, her son Daniel and her newborn son with boyfriend Niko Khale

The 38-year-old singer has openly shared her struggle of dealing with her mother’s battle with drug addiction since she was a child. On her television series, Keyshia Cole: The Way It Is, Keyshia introduced the world to her mother and sister, Neffeteria Pugh, and other members of her family. 

In a 2018 post, Keyshia described her mother's relapse as something that "breaks her heart more than it's already been broken."

Fans rallied in support of Keyshia, leaving encouraging comments such as, "I love that you never give up on her. FAMILY OVER EVERYTHING," and "Good Luck Frankie God Bless U."

Keyshia says she hopes 2020 will be the year for greatness with her family.

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Meek Mill at the 62nd annual Grammy Awards; Monty Brinton/CBSFollowing the all-star Grammy awards tribute to the late Nipsey Hussle Sunday night, Meek Mill and Roddy Ricch released a song in honor of The Marathon Continues rapper.

The duo dropped “Letter to Nipsey” Monday, with all proceeds to be donated to Hussle’s family.

During the Grammys, DJ Khaled and John Legend performed their song, “Higher,” featuring Hussle, which won the award for Best Rap/Sung Performance. Mill, Kirk Franklin and YG also performed in the tribute, which was introduced by Ava DuVernay.

Hussle also received a second posthumous Grammy as his track “Racks in the Middle” with Ricch and Hit-Boy won Best Rap Performance.

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ABC/Randy HolmesKanye West honored the late Kobe Bryant at a special midnight Sunday Service.

West freestyled a tribute to the late NBA legend at the event held in Burbank, California following the Grammy Awards, according to Billboard.  Kirk Franklin and Chance the Rapper also performed. 

Kanye also posted a throwback photo of him in a recording studio with Kobe, Swizz Beatz and Yasiin Bey, formerly known known as Mos Def.  

“Kobe, we love you brother,” Kanye tweeted. “We’re praying for your family and appreciate the life you’ve lived and all the inspiration you gave.”

Kanye’s wife, Kim Kardashianposted a photo of Kobe kissing his daughter, Gianna, who died at age 13 with him and seven other people in the helicopter crash Sunday in Calabasas, California. 

“My heart is so heavy. No one should ever experience what the families involved are going through,” Kim  commented. "This has affected us all so much but I cannot begin to imagine what Vanessa [Kobe’s wife] is feeling losing her husband and her baby girl. I cry just thinking about it. I am praying for the Bryant family, the Altobelli family and the families of all who perished in this unthinkable tragedy. Rest In Peace Legend.”

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Kobe, We love you brother

We’re praying for your family and appreciate the life you’ve lived and all the inspiration you gave pic.twitter.com/pxbgLOOmpY

— ye (@kanyewest) January 26, 2020


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StarzWhile Power fans are going bananas over the final season of the crime drama, one star is having difficulty tuning in.

Omari Hardwick, who plays drug kingpin James "Ghost" St. Patrick on Power, tells ABC News he hasn't been able to bring himself to watch the final season.

"I lived it," Hardwick said. "The mid-season finale...that, to me, was the finale."

Some of Hardwick's hesitation may come from the fact that he had a feeling what would happen to Ghost early on.  During season one, he emailed show creator Courtney Kemp to share what he thought the ultimate fate of his character should be.

"I said, 'I see this guy taking a bullet at the end.' I saw the fate of the show," Hardwick said. "That's five years ago. I saw him taking a bullet, but it was almost like Denzel [Washington] in Man on Fire."

He added, "Whether it was eight seasons or whether it was 20 seasons, Ghost had to give his life to save his brother and his best friend. So I did perceive an end, not dissimilar, but it wasn't necessarily this end."

Hardwick credits Kemp with writing a character who viewers saw as flawed, but struggling to be better..

"We literally added mirrors to the show," Hardwick said. "You'd see shattered mirrors, or broken mirrors, weird interesting looks of Ghost at himself within the mirror."

"...What we find attractive about human beings is...not just the fall, but when there's the fall, a lot of us are rooting for the person who is falling," he continued.

"We're almost figuratively extending our own hand, saying, 'Hey, I can help you up.' So Ghost was always getting up and falling. "

Power airs Sunday nights at 8 p.m. ET on Starz.

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  Francis Specker/CBS Heading into the 62nd Annual Grammy Awards on Sunday night, the question on many viewers minds was how the awards ceremony would acknowledge the controversy that's been swirling around it for several weeks regarding accusations of vote-rigging and other alleged misdeeds made by the Recording Academy's ousted CEO.  But following the tragic death of Kobe Bryant, his 13-year-old daughter and seven others in a helicopter crash on Sunday, the telecast turned into a tribute...and a reminder that music can be a powerful healing force.

Taking place at L.A.'s Staples Center -- "the house that Kobe Bryant built" -- the Grammys telecast immediately acknowledged the loss of Bryant in its first few seconds, as leading nominee Lizzo took the stage and stated, "Tonight is for Kobe."

Following Lizzo's performance, host Alicia Keys then took the stage to note, "We're all feeling crazy sadness right now...we lost a hero...and we're literally standing here heartbroken...so I would like to ask everybody to take a moment and hold [Kobe, his family and the victims] inside of you, and share our strength and our support with their families.  We never imagined in a million years we'd have to start the show like this."

Alicia and Boyz II Men then delivered an A cappella rendition of "It's So Hard to Say Goodbye to Yesterday."

But the Grammy controversy didn't go unremarked-upon.  After the first commercial break, Alicia, sitting at the piano, commented, "It's been a hell of a week. There's a lot going, on but I'm proud to be standing here."

Then, noting that it's a new decade and "a time for newness," she continued, "We refuse the negative energy. We refuse the old systems. We want to be respected and safe in our diversity. We want to be shifting to realness and inclusivity. So tonight, we want to celebrate the people—the artists that put themselves on the line and share their truth with us.”

Her comments appeared to refer to the accusations that the Recording Academy is a "boys' club" environment that was resistant to change.  Then, as part of a song that mentioned this year's nominees, she sang, "It's when good people do nothing that the bad guys win" -- which may have alluded to the controversy, or perhaps to what's happening politically.

But in accepting the first award of the night, Best Pop Solo Performance for "Truth Hurts," Lizzo brought everything back around to the tragedy and the theme of music as a healer.

"Today all of my little problems that I thought were big as the world were gone, and I realize that there’s people hurting right now," she told the crowd. "You guys create beautiful music. You guys create connectivity. And as I’m speaking to all of you all in this room, we need to reach out. This is the beginning of making music that moves people again...Let’s continue to reach out...and lift each other up."

The nods to Bryant continued through the night, with his #24 jersey prominently on display during several performances.  At the end of an all-star hip hop tribute to slain rapper Nipsey Hussle, Bryant's photo was displayed alongside Hussle's on the screen. And when John Legend accepted the Grammy for Best Rap/Sung Performance for Hussle's song "Higher," he told the crowd, "Let's love each other, let's love our families, let's hold each other tight."

But despite the tragedy, the Grammys also highlighted a new generation of exciting performers. 18-year-old Billie Eilish, the night's big winner with five trophies, including Album of the Year -- making her the youngest artist ever to win that prestigious category. 

2019's other breakout star Lizzo took home three awards, while 20-year-old chart-topping "Old Town Road" rapper Lil Nas X won two.  Plus, younger talent like Rosalia, H.E.R., Demi Lovato, Camila Cabello, Tyler, the Creator, BTS and Ariana Grande all got performance spotlights. 

The legends got some love as well.  Country icon Tanya Tucker won the first-ever Grammy awards of her career, despite having been first nominated back in 1973.  Disco legend Gloria Gaynor won her first Grammy in 40 years. 

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Peter Kramer/Getty ImagesAs The Game celebrates the 15th anniversary of his 2005 debut album, The Documentary, he remembers the beef that year with his mentor almost ended his life.  

The Game began his career on 50 Cent’s G-Unit label. Ten days after The Documentary dropped, Fiddy fired him from G-Unit, leading to an infamous shootout at a radio station in New York City.  

“At one point me and 50 really wanted to kill each other. I had a deep hate for him and he had a deep hate for me,” the Compton rapper tells NME.com. “We literally should have been another version of Biggie and Tupac. We both should have died in that beef." 

In 2016, The Game, born Jayceon Taylor, publicly announced at a L.A. nightclub that they had ended their feud. 

“Squashing that beef was probably the best thing for me and him to do. I’m glad we did it," Taylor continues. “Beefs usually don’t get squashed until someone gets murdered. That’s just how it is where I come from.” 

The Game says the murder of his good friend, Nipsey Hussle, who was fatally shot on March 31, 2019, haunts him every day.  

“Every morning my first thought is of Nip,” he says. “I got a statue of him in my room, which was made by a dope artist from Africa. As soon as I wake up, man, I say my piece to it and cross my heart. Nipsey was the people’s champ. He had what f*****g Martin Luther King had, what Malcolm X had.”

The Game featured Nipsey on the track “Welcome Home” on his latest album, Born 2 Rap. He says it'll be his final album, as he shifts his focus to developing talent for his label, Prolific Records.

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Francis Specker/CBSAs usual, the 62nd Annual Grammy Awards crammed a whole lot of extravagant, emotional and occasionally mind-blowing performances -- and very few actual awards -- into a three-and-a-half hour telecast.  There was a lot of profanity onstage -- both in the acceptance speeches and in the lyrics of the songs -- causing the telecast to be perhaps the most highly-bleeped Grammys ever. Here's a rundown of who performed what:

Lizzo kicked off the show with a medley of her song "Cuz I Love You" -- which she sang while wearing a huge, black sparkly gown while conducting an orchestral string section -- and "Truth Hurts," for which she stripped down to a futuristic bodysuit.  The performance featured plenty of dancers as well as one of Lizzo's signature flute solos.

Blake Shelton and his girlfriend Gwen Stefani had one of the first numbers of the night, singing their new duet "Nobody But You."  They sweetly held each other's hands through the performance.

Following a brief a cappella performance of "It's So Hard to Say Goodbye to Yesterday" with Boyz II Men in honor of the late Kobe Bryant, host Alicia Keys sang a version of Lewis Capaldi's Grammy-nominated "Someone You Loved" with the lyrics changed to be about this year's nominees -- the chorus was, "I'mma get you kinda used to hearing music you love."

The Jonas Brothers were up next: First, they performed a stripped-down performance of an unreleased song that may have been called "Five Minutes," and they took the stage for a massive performance of their current hit "What a Man Gotta Do," complete with dancers, horns and fireworks. Nick Jonas appeared to have something stuck in his teeth throughout, which he later acknowledged by tweeting, "At least you all know I eat my greens."

Tyler, The Creator gave the most bonkers performance of the night. It started out somewhat chill, as he performed "Earfquake" with Charlie Wilson and Boyz II Men. Then, he was joined onstage by dozens of Tyler lookalikes, all wearing the same blonde pageboy wig and white-and-red suit as he sang "New Magic Wand" on a set that looked like an empty suburban street. The song climaxed with Tyler jumping up and down and screaming and the entire street burning down; he then fell backwards off the part of the stage he was standing on and disappeared.

Usher performed a Prince tribute as a way of promoting the upcoming CBS-TV special Let's Go Crazy: A GRAMMY Salute to Prince.  Singing and dancing his way through "Little Red Corvette," "When Doves Cry" and "Kiss," Usher was backed up by Prince's close friend Sheila E. Oddly, even though FKA Twigs was introduced as being part of the performance, all she did was dance on a stripper pole and then slink around, rubbing up against Usher and looking sexy.

Camila Cabello gave one of the most emotional performances of the night, singing "First Man," a tribute to her father Alejandro Cabello, while home movies of him with a baby Camila were shown.  At the end of the song, she came off the stage and stood in front of her dad, singing directly to him, as he wept openly. They embraced at the end of the song.

Country icon Tanya Tucker, who won her very first Grammys on Sunday, performed a stripped-down version of her winning song "Bring My Flowers Now" with her co-writer and musical collaborator Brandi Carlile.

Ariana Grande gave an elaborate performance of three songs.  She started out dressed in a ballgown, singing "My Favorite Things" with a string section.  Then, she stripped off her gown, donned some sexy sleepwear, and moved onto a bedroom set to sing her nominated song "7 Rings," which interpolates "My Favorite Things."  She finished off with part of her smash hit "thank u, next."

The night's big winner, Billie Eilish, performed a hushed version of her song "when the party's over" with her brother and musical collaborator Finneas on piano, plus a backing choir.

Lifetime Achievement honorees Aerosmith performed "Livin' on the Edge" -- during which lead singer Steven Tyler stopped in the audience in front of Lizzo and yelled, "I f***ing love you!" -- and then teamed up with Run-DMC for their smash hit "Walk This Way."  There was no last-minute reprieve for drummer Joey Kramer, who the band had barred from performing with them because they claimed his playing wasn't up to par. He sued...and lost.

Lil Nas X performed his 19-week number-one hit "Old Town Road" on a stage set that revolved to show different rooms, and in each room, there was a different act who joined him to perform the song, including K-pop superstars BTS, Diplo, Mason Ramsey and, of course, Billy Ray Cyrus. At the very end, none other than Nas -- the rap legend who inspired Lil Nas X's stage name -- joined the younger artist onstage to sing "Rodeo."

Another emotional of a moment came from Demi Lovato, who performed a raw ballad called "Anyone," which she wrote just four days before she overdosed in 2018.  She was so choked up that she had to stop the song and start it again, and then sang it with tears running down her face. She got a standing ovation at the end.

A tribute to slain rapper Nipsey Hussle featured Meek Mill, DJ Khaled, John Legend, Kirk Franklin, Roddy Ricch and YG, who was arrested on robbery charges two days before the Grammys.  Meek kicked off the performance by performing a rap addressed to Hussle; Roddy Ricch then did "Letter to Nipsey." Khaled, Franklin, YG and Legend performed "Higher," which then went on to win the Grammy for Best Rap/Sung performance.  Hussle's other song "Racks in the Middle" also won a Grammy during the pre-telecast awards.

Spanish star Rosalía and a troupe of dancers performed her flamenco-inspired songs "Malamente" and "Juro Qué."

At the podium to present Song of the Year, Little Big Town and Smokey Robinson harmonized on his composition "My Girl."

Alicia Keys and Alabama Shakes frontwoman Brittany Howard performed a stripped-down version of Alicia's current single "Underdog," co-written by Ed Sheeran. By the end of the song, Alicia, joined by a troupe of dancers, had moved to a satellite stage with a piano, which rose in the air for a dramatic finale.

Singer, songwriter and guitarist H.E.R. performed her song "Sometimes" at the piano, backed by a line of musicians in single file behind her, and then she stood up and ripped off a searing guitar solo.

Bonnie Raitt performed a brief rendition of John Prine's song "Angel from Montgomery" in tribute to Prine; that was followed by guitarist Gary Clark Jr. performing his Grammy-winning song "This Land," which is about racism and immigration.

The final performance of the evening was a version of "I Sing the Body Electric" from the 1980 movie Fame, featuring Camila Cabello, Cyndi Lauper, Ben Platt, pianist Lang Lang, violinist Joshua Bell, Gary Clark Jr., ballerina Misty Copeland and a chorus of student musicians. It was a tribute to music education, and to Grammy producer Ken Ehrlich, who after 40 years is stepping aside.

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Francis Specker/CBS Heading into the 62nd Annual Grammy Awards on Sunday night, the question on many viewers minds was how the awards ceremony would acknowledge the controversy that's been swirling around it for several weeks regarding accusations of vote-rigging and other alleged misdeeds made by the Recording Academy's ousted CEO.  But following the tragic death of Kobe Bryant, his 13-year-old daughter and seven others in a helicopter crash on Sunday, the telecast turned into a tribute...and a reminder that music can be a powerful healing force.

Taking place at L.A.'s Staples Center -- "the house that Kobe Bryant built" -- the Grammys telecast immediately acknowledged the loss of Bryant in its first few seconds, as leading nominee Lizzo took the stage and stated, "Tonight is for Kobe."

Following Lizzo's performance, host Alicia Keys then took the stage to note, "We're all feeling crazy sadness right now...we lost a hero...and we're literally standing here heartbroken...so I would like to ask everybody to take a moment and hold [Kobe, his family and the victims] inside of you, and share our strength and our support with their families.  We never imagined in a million years we'd have to start the show like this."

Alicia and Boyz II Men then delivered an A cappella rendition of "It's So Hard to Say Goodbye to Yesterday."

But the Grammy controversy didn't go unremarked-upon.  After the first commercial break, Alicia, sitting at the piano, commented, "It's been a hell of a week. There's a lot going, on but I'm proud to be standing here."

Then, noting that it's a new decade and "a time for newness," she continued, "We refuse the negative energy. We refuse the old systems. We want to be respected and safe in our diversity. We want to be shifting to realness and inclusivity. So tonight, we want to celebrate the people—the artists that put themselves on the line and share their truth with us.”

Her comments appeared to refer to the accusations that the Recording Academy is a "boys' club" environment that was resistant to change.  Then, as part of a song that mentioned this year's nominees, she sang, "It's when good people do nothing that the bad guys win" -- which may have alluded to the controversy, or perhaps to what's happening politically.

But in accepting the first award of the night, Best Pop Solo Performance for "Truth Hurts," Lizzo brought everything back around to the tragedy and the theme of music as a healer.

"Today all of my little problems that I thought were big as the world were gone, and I realize that there’s people hurting right now," she told the crowd. "You guys create beautiful music. You guys create connectivity. And as I’m speaking to all of you all in this room, we need to reach out. This is the beginning of making music that moves people again...Let’s continue to reach out...and lift each other up."

The nods to Bryant continued through the night, with his #24 jersey prominently on display during several performances.  At the end of an all-star hip hop tribute to slain rapper Nipsey Hussle, Bryant's photo was displayed alongside Hussle's on the screen. And when John Legend accepted the Grammy for Best Rap/Sung Performance for Hussle's song "Higher," he told the crowd, "Let's love each other, let's love our families, let's hold each other tight."

But despite the tragedy, the Grammys also highlighted a new generation of exciting performers. 18-year-old Billie Eilish, the night's big winner with five trophies, including Album of the Year -- making her the youngest artist ever to win that prestigious category. 

2019's other breakout star Lizzo took home three awards, while 20-year-old chart-topping "Old Town Road" rapper Lil Nas X won two.  Plus, younger talent like Rosalia, H.E.R., Demi Lovato, Camila Cabello, Tyler, the Creator, BTS and Ariana Grande all got performance spotlights. 

The legends got some love as well.  Country icon Tanya Tucker won the first-ever Grammy awards of her career, despite having been first nominated back in 1973.  Disco legend Gloria Gaynor won her first Grammy in 40 years. 

On the classic rock side of things, Elvis Costello & the Imposters won Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album for Look Now, while the massive Woodstock: Back to the Garden boxed set won for Best Boxed or Special Limited Edition Package.

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Celebrity sports fans from around the world are paying homage to NBA legend Kobe Bryant after he died in a helicopter crash in California on Sunday.

Fellow former NBA stars Scottie Pippen, Shaquille O'Neal, and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar were among the high-profile players who reacted to news of the beloved basketball player's death.

Bryant was one of nine people on a private helicopter that went down in Calabasas, California on Sunday, killing everyone on board. He was 41.

Bryant's 13-year-old daughter, Gianna, was also killed in the crash, according to the NBA. The other seven victims in the crash have not been identified.

"I’m stunned. Words can’t even come close to describing it. Just an incredibly sad and tragic day," Pippen, an NBA Hall of Famer, tweeted.

Shaquille O'Neal, who played with Kobe on the Lakers, shared an emotional post.

"There’s no words to express the pain Im going through with this tragedy of loosing my neice Gigi & my brother @kobebryant I love u and u will be missed," O'Neal wrote. "My condolences goes out to the Bryant family and the families of the other passengers on board. IM SICK RIGHT NOW."

Meanwhile, retired NBA star Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, posted a video of himself reacting to the news.

"Most people will remember Kobe as the magnificent athlete who inspired a whole generation of basketball players," he wrote in part. "But I will always remember him as a man who was much more than an athlete."

Twitter temporarily crashed at around 3 p.m. ET as news of the player's death flooded the platform. The term "Kobe" quickly became the No. 1 trending topic on Twitter, followed by "Mamba" and "BlackMamba."

Music stars also reacted to the news of Bryant's passing, with Drake posting a mural of Bryant on Instagram and R&B singer John Legend reminding fans to hold their loved ones close.

"I'm so sad and stunned right now. In Staples Arena, where Kobe created so many memories for all of us, preparing to pay tribute to another brilliant man we lost too soon, Nipsey Hussle," Legend, who was preparing for the Grammy Awards, tweeted. "Life can be so brutal and senseless sometimes. Hold on to your loved ones. We miss you, Kobe."

Other notable reactions throughout the day have included former President Barack Obama, Mariah Carey, Justin Bieber, Demi Lovato and Kevin Hart.

"Kobe was a legend on the court and just getting started in what would have been just as meaningful a second act. To lose Gianna is even more heartbreaking to us as parents," Obama wrote. "Michelle and I send love and prayers to Vanessa and the entire Bryant family on an unthinkable day."

"This makes me so sad. Kobe you were always so sweet to me. Known you over 10 years.. not super well but we always joked about you coming over and playing that game of horse!" Lavato wrote, sharing a photo of herself with Kobe and Gianna. "You will he so missed by so many. You’re a legend with wings now. RIP Kobe."

"This honestly doesn’t make sense....I just saw you man," Hart wrote, sharing a image of Bryant on Instagram. "This hurts my heart. God please place your hands on his family and help guide them thru this unbearable time. We love you forever man...Legends never die!!!! #MambaMentality #RIP.... RIP to the other passengers as well as sending prayers to their families."

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Kevin Winter/Getty ImagesNBA icon and Oscar-winner Kobe Bryant was killed Sunday morning in a helicopter crash in Los Angeles, ABC News has confirmed. He was 41.

Bryant's 13-year-old daughter, Gianna, died alongside her father, NBA Commissioner Adam Silver said in a statement.

There were nine people on board the helicopter and no survivors in the crash around 10 a.m. local time Sunday, fire officials said in a press conference. The other victims have not been publicly identified.

The Sikorsky S-76 helicopter crashed under unknown circumstances, a spokesperson from the National Transportation Safety Board told ABC News. Firefighters worked to contain the fire that resulted.

Bryant was drafted to the NBA out of high school in 1996 and spent his entire 20-year career with the Los Angeles Lakers, winning five NBA championships. He was awarded NBA MVP in 2008 and NBA Finals MVP in 2009 and 2010.

He won gold medals as a member of the U.S. men's basketball team in the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing and the 2012 Summer Olympics in London.

LeBron James surpassed Bryant's all-time scoring record on Saturday during the Lakers' game against the Philadelphia 76ers. Bryant tweeted at James congratulating him on beating his record.

In 2018, Bryant won an Academy award for his animated short Dear Basketball, based on a poem he wrote in 2015 when he announced his retirement.

(Story developing...)

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Recording AcademyPrince is one of H.E.R.’s idols, so when she was selected to perform in the Grammy Awards tribute to the Minneapolis icon, it was a surreal moment.

“I can't believe it -- it doesn't feel real,” the two-time Grammy winner tells Billboard.

H.E.R. will be among the artists featured in a two-hour special, titled Let's Go Crazy: The Grammy Salute to Prince, which will be recorded January 28, two days after the Grammys.

“I spoke to Sheila E. who's putting it all together. She was telling me stories about her and Prince, and how she really appreciated my artistry. The fact that she worked so closely with him... it's crazy that she could say that about me,” she continues.

“I'm so excited because I try to honor him in any way that I could, and now I can do it on a big stage alongside all the other legends who are performing,” the 22-year-old singer adds.

H.E.R. often plays the ”Purple Rain” guitar solo to close her concerts, so don’t be surprised if she performs the Grammy- and Oscar-winning classic.

In high school, H.E.R. was told she would be a failure. Now with ten Grammy nominations in two years, she’s proving her critics wrong.

“It's crazy to think that I've [accomplished all of this] in just two years and that my first nomination became a win. [Best R&B Album for H.E.R.],” she says. “You question the path that you're on sometimes and I have no right to do that now! I know I'm exactly where I'm supposed to be." 

H.E.R has five nominations for the Grammy Awards on Sunday night, including Record of the Year and Song of the Year, for “Hard Place,” and Album of the Year for I Used to Know Her. 

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Such an honor! 💜 https://t.co/j6syh5Loi8 pic.twitter.com/BYjDmpx6tE

— H.E.R. (@HERMusicx) January 23, 2020

 

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ABC/Lou RoccoAfter Terry Crews weighed in on the controversy surrounding Gabrielle Union's America's Got Talent firing -- which came following her claims of a toxic work culture -- Union is now seemingly calling out Crews for his comments.

In a series of tweets on Friday, Union appeared to react to an interview Crews did on the third hour of NBC's Today show, during which he called the AGT set "the most diverse place" he had ever worked in his career.

"Why anyone would gleefully get up on TV and tell lies that NO ONE disputed...But we already know," Union wrote, responding to a fan who said it was "wild to see people pretend that the glaring racism doesn't exist."

She then seemingly questioned the "diversity" that Crews said existed on set.

"Can someone please ask abt what happens to all that diversity folks are talking about BEHIND THE SCENES," she tweeted. "Like, legit... where the hell is all that diversity in the production though homie? In the decision making ranks who control the fate of the diversity in front of the camera?"

She also seemingly addressed Crews' assertion that because Union didn't send out an official statement, her allegations hadn't been confirmed.

Referring to the investigation into her complaints that NBC is conducting, she wrote, "Maaaaaan...We all agreed to let the investigation be completed before speaking but if we doing this, ohhhhh baby let's gooooooooooo!"

As previously reported, Union was fired from America's Got Talent following her reported complaints about the allegedly racially insensitive work environment on set.  Her firing resulted in immense backlash, and Union then confirmed that she met with NBC to discuss her complaints and "express [her] unfiltered truth."

Crews, Simon Cowell and Howie Mandel are all expected to return to AGT for its next season.

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Paras Griffin/Getty ImagesFollowing the coroner’s report that Juice WRLD’s death was the result of an accidental drug overdose, his estate announced it plans to share unreleased music.  

"You guys meant the world to Juice and by listening to his music, watching his videos and sharing your stories about him, you are keeping his memory alive forever,” his family wrote in a statement posted on Juice Wrld's Instagram page.  “We plan to honor Juice’s talents, his spirit, and the love he felt for his fans by sharing unreleased music and other projects that he was passionately in the process of developing.”  

The statement also revealed there will be a public tribute in Juice's hometown, Chicago, with details to be announced soon.

As previously reported, the Cook County Medical Examiner’s Office announced Wednesday that the rapper, born Jarad A. Higgins, died as a result of oxycodone and codeine toxicity. 

Higgins died on December 8, only six days after his 21st birthday. He suffered convulsions at Midway Airport in Chicago following a flight from Los Angeles. 

The “Lucid Dreams” rapper went into cardiac arrest as federal agents were searching his luggage for guns and drugs. Forty-one bags of marijuana were allegedly found, along with prescription codeine cough syrup, two .9mm pistols, a .40-caliber pistol, a high-capacity ammunition magazine and metal-piercing bullets.

Law enforcement officials say Juice swallowed several Percocet painkiller pills in an attempt to hide them from the feds.

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Steve Granitz/WireImageLauren London is honoring the legacy of her late boyfriend, Nipsey Hussle, with the new fashion collection, “Hustle and Motivate.”

The ATL actress, who has a three-year-old son fathered by The Marathon Continues rapper, posted a photo on Instagram of her posing with YG, J. Stone, Killa Twan and Pacman Da Gunman, wearing the new line.

The 35-year-old actress also posted a solo shot wearing a “Hustle and Motivate” T-shirt with the embroidered message, “We, The Marathon Clothing, honor the endurance and unwavering faith of those that never quit. Our products represent their testimony. Life is a marathon.”

The “Hustle and Motivate” collection is a partnership with Hussle’s Marathon Clothing and Puma. An official relese date for the collection has not yet been announced.

Last month, London shared some of the campaign images from her new "Forever Stronger" collaboration with Puma.

At the Grammy Awards on Sunday night, John LegendMeek Mill, DJ Khaled, Kirk Franklin, Roddy Ricch and YG will perform a tribute to Hussle, who was fatally shot on March 31, 2019 at age 33. 

Nipsey is nominated for three Grammys: Best Rap Performance and Best Rap Song for "Racks in the Middle," featuring Ricch and Hit-Boy, and Best Rap/Sung Performance for "Higher," his collabo with Khaled and Legend.

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Nathan Congleton/NBCAmerica's Got Talent host Terry Crews apparently had a very different experience on the set of NBC's variety series.

Amid the network's investigation into Gabrielle Union's departure from the show following claims of a toxic culture, Crews tells NBC's Today that he begs to differ.

“First of all, I can't speak for sexism because I’m not a woman, but I can speak on behalf of any racism comments. That was never my experience," he said. "In fact, it was the most diverse place I have ever been in my 20 years of entertainment."

"The Top 10 acts were Asian, women, older, younger, black, white, it was everything in the gamut,” he continued, defending the shows' diversity.

Crews went on to say that he even sought out the advice of his wife, actress Rebecca King-Crews, and her thoughts on what she should do in the wake of Union's claims.

"She was like, 'first of all, if it's coming from an unnamed source – because Gabrielle Union has not made any statement to this day about any of these allegations publicly …if she hasn't made a statement, why would you?'"

When asked if he's spoken to Union, beyond his tweet in December where he told Union she "will be missed," Crews replied, “I haven’t reached out, but I haven’t heard anything,” he said.

As previously reported, Union was fired from America's Got Talent following her reported complaints about the allegedly racially insensitive work environment on set. Following the immense backlash about her firing, Union confirmed that she met with NBC to discuss her complaints and "express [her] unfiltered truth."

Crews, Simon Cowell and Howie Mandel are all expected to return to AGT for its next season.

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Scott Dudelson/Getty ImagesYG was arrested Friday morning at his home in Chatsworth, California.

According to ABC Los Angeles affiliate, KABC-TV, the LA County Sheriff charged the “Big Bank” rapper with robbery, and he was taken to the Men’s Central Jail.  No further details about the alleged crime were revealed. 

The 29-year-old artist is being held on $250,000 bail and will be arraigned Tuesday. 

Last July, homicide detectives arrived at YG’s home with a search warrant in connection with a fatal crash. Police say his vehicle was involved in a crash and shootout with deputies and a gunman that resulted in the death of an innocent bystander. YG wasn't charged and denied knowledge of the incident.  

It was unknown as of Friday afternoon whether YG would be free in time to make his scheduled performance with John Legend, Meek Mill, DJ Khaled, Kirk Franklin, and Roddy Ricch in a tribute to the late Nipsey Hussle Sunday night on the Grammy Awards.

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